Saturday, May 23, 2020

Emotional Isolation in Mary Shelleys Life and in...

Emotional isolation in Frankenstein is the most pertinent and prevailing theme throughout the novel. This theme is so important because everything the monster does or feels directly relates to his poignant seclusion. The effects of this terrible burden have progressively damaging results upon the monster, and indirectly cause him to act out his frustrations on the innocent. The monsters emotional isolation makes him gradually turn worse and worse until evil fully prevails. This theme perpetuates from Mary Shelleys personal life and problems with her father and husband, which carry on into the work and make it more realistic.(Mellor 32) During the time she was writing this novel, she was experiencing the emotional pangs of her†¦show more content†¦Henry Clerval had a striking resemblance to Percys alter ego, and Mary most likely wanted to spend the rest of her life with a man like this. Mary also blamed Percy for the death of her baby because when she needed a doctor, h e would not allow her to immediately see one. Following the death of their child, he was by no means supportive of Marys needs and feelings, which ultimately propelled her into further pain and dejection. This feeling of resentment shows in Frankenstein when Victor shuns his newly created monster and casts it out of his life. The monster goes as far as saying, I am malicious because I am miserable. Her feelings of isolation can be established with But it was all a dream; no Eve soothed my sorrows nor shared my thoughts; I was alone. I remembered Adams supplication to his Creator. But where was mine? He had abandoned me, and in the bitterness of my heart I cursed him. Marys feelings of resentment, regret, despair, and even hatred are very clear and unwavering throughout the story, and the isolation the monster feels is heavily dependant on her situation. The monsters gradual descent into evil most likely follows the path of depression Mary Shelley takes in the course of her life. First, her father is taken away, much like the separation the monster feels when Victor shuns him. Next, she suffers the extreme losses of her half-sister and newborn, which parallelsShow MoreRelatedMary Shelley and Flannery OConnor: Gothic Isolationists1724 Words   |  7 Pagesdeveloped into a 19th century phenomenon. The success of this dominant genre in England is frequently attributed to Mary Shelley. Despite its success during this time period, gothic fiction ceased to be a dominant genre by the Victorian Era. However, in many ways it had now begun to enter into its most ingenious phase. This paper will analyze the influence of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein on Flannery O’Connor’s work, specifically her novel Wise Blood. Flannery O’Connor emerged as a crucial and contemporaryRead MoreFrankenstein, By Mary Shelley1650 Words   |  7 Pagesthe book of Frankenstein does one just think of a mythical science fiction book that really has no meaning? Frankenstein can have numerous meanings depending on how a person perceives it. Frankenstein can be analyzed into many themes; some say religion, feminism, or scientific symbolization, it all depends on ones own perception. When one analyzes further into Mary Shelly’s life and then interprets the novel it is obvious that is a sociological theme. One can simply assume that Mary Shelley createsRead MoreMary Shelley s Frankenstein - Original Writing1489 Words   |  6 Pagesrecurred, but I was unable to solve them (Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein).† Mary Shelley’s book, Frankenstein, parallels her own experiences. Shelley’s mother died in childbirth, and she was left â€Å"dependent on none and related to none.† Her father, William Godwin, abandoned his daughter emotionally when he remarried a woman who treated Mary poorly. Shelley often searched for an understanding of who she was. She did not have a mother to give her an education, so Mary taught herself by seeking answers toRead MoreMary Shelley s Frankenstein - Original Writing1146 Words   |  5 Pagesrecurred, but I was unable to solve them (Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein).† Mary Shelley’s book, Frankenstein, parallels her own experiences. Shelley’s mother died in childbirth, and she was left â€Å"dependent on none and related to none.† Her father, William Godwin, abandoned his daughter emotionally when he remarried a woman who treated Mary poorly. Shelley often searched for an understanding of who she was. She did not have a mother to give her an education, so Mary taught herself by seeking answers toRead MoreEssay about Frankenstein by Mary Shelly1174 Words   |  5 Pagesor major events that affected them psychologically. Authors use the unconscious mind that manifests in actions and Mary Shelley is no exception. In her famous novel about a creation and his creator, the unconscious transformation through adolescents in her life is visible. Some of her own adolescent issues were infused into the creature’s character. People could look at Frankenstein as a dramatic journal entry, allowing Shelley to be able to write about p ersonal issues as she was navigating the trickyRead MoreFrankenstein Literary Analysis Essay903 Words   |  4 PagesFrankenstein Literary Analysis Friends will determine the direction and quality of your life. Loneliness is a battle that all people will once face at a certain point in their life; it is how they handle it that determines the outcome of that battle. In Mary Shelleys Frankenstein loneliness is the most significant and prevailing theme throughout the entire novel. Shelley takes her readers on a wild journey that shows how loneliness can end in tragedy. Robert Walton is the first characterRead MoreTheme Of Isolation In Frankenstein1077 Words   |  5 PagesIsolation in Frankenstein The consequences of isolation can be both physical and emotional. For the characters in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, isolation does both in varying degrees.Through Victor’s self-destructive path for knowledge and revenge, the creature’s descent from curiosity and benevolence to misery and revenge, and Walton’s journey to the Arctic, Mary Shelley explores the theme of isolation in that whether it is intentional or not, isolation only leads to negative consequences. Read MoreZombies And Its Effects On Society1718 Words   |  7 PagesZombies appear to be evolving not only physically, but mentally as well. Due to their adaptations to feelings of sadness, love, and isolation, zombies have been rising in popularity. Their emotional adaptations have extended as far as zombies having romantic relationships, allowing the new genre of film, zombie romance, to peak the horizon and contribute to their prominence throughout history. In addition, the effects of their popularity on society include studies that have shown children obtainingRead MoreEssay on Frankenstein: Reflecting Mary Shelley’s Life Experiences2738 Words   |  11 Pagesis especially true in the case of Mary Shelley. Shelley began her novel at the age of 18 when the most prominent materials in the consciousness and unconsciousness of Shelley were concerned with the conflicts stemming from the death of her mother. Frankenstein is the outcome of Shelley’s unresolved grief f or the death of her mother which was the crisis she needed to work through to forget her own adult identity. Mary was the daughter of a revolutionary author Mary Wollstonecraft who is regarded asRead MoreScience May Be Interesting To Most, But Its Development1781 Words   |  8 Pageswarned of this in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. This extremely famous novel is about a scientist named Victor Frankenstein who creates a grotesque creature, using electricity. Many assume the creature’s name to be Frankenstein as it may be depicted in movies but this is false, as the scientist’s name is Frankenstein and the monster does not have a name. New developing science allows Victor to create this creature which, as we learn throughout the story, should never have been created. Mary Shelley uses

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Mithridates and the Mithridatic Wars

While still a child, Mithridates, later King Mithridates VI of Pontus, official friend of Rome, developed a reputation that included matricide and a paranoid fear of being poisoned. Roman Treaties - Information on What Is Meant by a Friend of Rome During the Roman Republic, competing military leaders Sulla and Marius wanted the honor of disposing of the greatest challenge to Roman supremacy since the Punic War general Hannibal Barca. From the end of the second to the middle of the first century B.C, this was the long-lived Mithridates VI of Pontus (132-63 B.C.), a thorn in Romes side for 40 years. The rivalry between the two Roman generals led to the  loss of blood at home, but only one of them, Sulla, confronted Mithridates abroad. Despite the great battlefield competence of Sulla and Marius  and their personal confidence in their ability to check the Eastern despot, it was neither Sulla nor Marius who put an end to the Mithridatic problem. Instead, it was Pompey the Great, who earned his honorific in the process. Location of Pontus - Home of Mithridates The mountainous district of Pontus lay on the eastern side of the Black Sea, beyond the province of Asia and Bithynia, north of Galatia and Cappadocia, west of Armenia, and south of Colchis. [See Map of Asia Minor.] It was founded by King Mithridates I Ktistes (301-266 B.C.). In the Third Punic War (149 - 146 B.C.), King Mithridates V Euergetes (r. 150-120) who claimed descent from the Persian King Darius, helped Rome. Rome gave him Phrygia Major in gratitude. He was the most powerful king in Asia Minor. By the time Rome had annexed Pergamum to create the province of Asia (129 B.C.), the kings of Pontus had moved from their capital in Amasia to rule from the Black Sea port city of Sinope. Mithridates - Youth and Poison In 120 B.C., while still a child, Mithridates (Mithradates) Eupator (132-83 B.C.) became king of the area of Asia Minor known as Pontus. His mother may have assassinated her husband, Mithridates V, in order to take power, since she served as regent and ruled in her young sons stead. Afraid his mother would try to kill him, Mithridates went into hiding. During this time, Mithridates started ingesting small doses of various poisons in order to develop an immunity. When Mithridates returned (c. 115-111), he took command, imprisoned his mother (and, possibly, ordered her execution), and started to extend his dominion.After Mithridates acquired Greek towns in Colchis and whats now the Crimea, he developed a strong fleet to hold his territories. But that wasnt all. Since the Greek towns hed overtaken proved so lucrative, providing resources in the form of revenue, officers, and mercenary soldiers, Mithridates wanted to increase his Greek holdings. Next page Mithridates expands his empire Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 Print SourcesH. H. Scullards revised version of F.B. Marshs Roman World 146-30 B.C.Cambridge Ancient History Vol. IX, 1994. Also on this site Gaius Julius CaesarGaius MariusSullaTimeline of the Late Roman Republic Previous Articles -I tell the tale that I heard told.Mithridates, he died old.From A.E. Housman Terence, this is stupid stuff

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Fairtale Essay Free Essays

string(45) " be a male and what it means to be a female\." One of the most well known, well loved and influential genre of literature is the fairy tale. A fairy tale is defined by the Oxford dictionary as â€Å"A children’s story of magical and imaginary beings and lands†. Overtime the concept of fairy tales has changed. We will write a custom essay sample on Fairtale Essay or any similar topic only for you Order Now Fairy tales are being re-written and re-illustrated constantly, which makes fairy tales appealing to every generation. Fairy tales broaden the imagination of children. They allow us gain an insight into a world of magic and adventure- a world we will never experience but fantasize about. â€Å"Fairy tales are nothing if not realistic: and it is their cynicism that keeps them lively. (Opie, 1980, p. 19) â€Å"A characteristic of the fairy tale, as told today, is that it is unbelievable. Although a fairy tale is seldom a tale about fairy-folk and does not necessarily even feature a fairy, it does contain an enchantment or other supernatural element that is clearly imaginary. † (Opie, 1980 p. 18). The origin of fairy tales is commonly unknown and more often than not never discovered by the reader. French writers Catherine Bernard, Marie-Jeanne Lheitier, Marie-Catherine d’Aulnoy are believed to be â€Å"chiefly responsible for the establishment of the fairytale as a lite racy genre in Europe. (Zipes, 2006,p. 13) of the 1960s. However, it was Italian writers Giovan Francesco Straparola and Giambattista Basile who played a major role in the rise of literacy in Europe. â€Å"This is one of the best kept secrets that is well worth unlocking because it reveals just how closely tied the literacy fairy tale as genre is to spread of the civilizing process throughout Europe. †(Zipes, 2006, p. 13) However, it was the influence of Boccaccio’s Decamerone that led to the production of various collections of ‘novelle’ that had an impact on the literacy fairy tale as a short narrative. Straparola was the first to publish his collection â€Å"Le piacevoli notti (1550 and 1553) from the example Boccaccio had set. Straparola was different from previous writers. He was the first European writer â€Å"to adapt many tales from oral tradition, creating approximately fourteen literacy fairy tales in his collection of seventy four novella. † (Zipes, 2006, p. 14) Straparola’s work caused some controversy and at one time one of his collections was banned by the pope in 1791. This was due to themes which Straparola had included in his work. He introduced â€Å"plain earthy language† and â€Å"critical view of power struggles in Italian society†. Basile shared similar views on power and civility. (Zipes, 2006). Even form this early stage, fairy tales have always been connected to power, social class and gender stereotyping. Both Straparola and Basile recognised that Italian principalities were being damaged through family conflicts, the change in commerce and trade and war. They used fairy tale’s as a written means of broaching their concern over the unexpected change of norms on human behaviour. Although time passes and things change, fairytales have not dated. The classic fairy tales that Basile and Straparola once told are still being told to children today all over the world. Thanks to the origination of the fairytale by Straparola and Basil â€Å"we still rely on its narrative strategy to see how dangerous it is to think that we live in more civilized and better world than the realms of the past. †(Zipes, 2006) For centuries young children have been enthralled by fairy tales. Tales of witches, wizards, princes and princesses, fairy godmothers and villains alike have been influencing how children view the world around them. This appears particularly true in the case of young girls, with whom these stories seem to resonate. However living in a contemporary 22nd century society the question needs to be posed; are these stories, written centuries ago, still providing a relevant and realistic portrayal of female role models to the youth of today? Or are these folktales of ‘prince charming’ and ‘happily ever afters’ corrupting ideals from infancy and setting these young girls up for disappointment? Women today have come along away from their 18th century counterparts. Women have fought for years to be able to vote, work, raise children as a lone parent and run a household. Women have gained their right to respect and independence in a world that is no longer dominated my males. These rights are marked as historic events that women are extremely proud of. However still today, when educating children we use â€Å"fairy tales† as means of communicating, although sometimes indirectly, the role women should play in life. For example, in fairy tales, the concept of beauty is outlined very clearly. Beauty is expressed as a physical necessity. The leading lady in the typical fairy tale is usually described and illustrated as a woman possessing features considered physically attractive to males, a thin figure, glowing skin, red lips, symmetrical facial features and well attired. In the classical tale of Sleeping Beauty Aurora has â€Å"red lips as red as the red red rose† fair skin, blue eyes long blonde hair and an impossibly thin figure. This seems to be the universal concept of what beauty is among all the fairy tales that Walt Disney have produced. This image of beauty is in stark contrast to the reality in which we live into today. This depiction of the need for beauty is not the only negative stereotype conveyed in fairy tales. Instead of being able to defend and stick up for themselves, women are forever relying on males to rescue them. Whether it be the ‘handsome prince charming’ or the father figure, a male, nevertheless is always there to save the day and resolve whatever predicament has arisen in order for all involved except the villain to live â€Å"happily ever after†. The act of stereotyping serves as a short-cut to the way that the majority of the population views our culture. Therefore, though we might not completely agree with the way in which gender roles are represented in these fairy tales, it still serves us well in a sense that we might gain a basic understanding of what it means to be a male and what it means to be a female. You read "Fairtale Essay" in category "Essay examples" Whether personally accepted or rejected, the notion of males being dominant and females being subordinate has been deeply embedded into our culture’s view of the gender roles. The villain is also an interesting stereotype which is evident in all fairy tales. Villains are portrayed as ugly, malicious, jealous characters. They are almost always characterised by being an evil step-mother, wicked queen, a witch or an evil mother in law. The job of the villain in a fairytale is to make life difficult for the leading protagonist. The queen in Basile’s version of Snow White is described as â€Å"a murderous and unnatural, unsexed anomaly who tricks Talia†¦ †(Warner ,1995,p. 220). However, evil they are, they always play a powerful female role in all the fairy tales I have chosen to discuss. To consider whether the portrayals of women in classic fairy tales are genuine role models for young girls, I will be examining and referring to the following books: Cinderella , Beauty and the Beast, The Little Mermaid, Sleeping Beauty, Snow White and the seven dwarfs, Mulan and Shrek. Certainly by examining classic fairy tales it is obvious that the central female character is continuously presented as being ‘beautiful’. In the classic tale of Beauty and the Beast, the story begins with â€Å"Once upon a time there lived a rich merchant with three pretty daughters. The youngest was the prettiest of the there and she was called beauty. † From the very beginning of the story, emphasis is put on how beautiful Belle is in the fairytale. The fact that the lead character is appreciated for her beauty alone speaks multitudes about the message the story gives out to its reader and indeed to young girls. â€Å"There is the threatened union of an almost supernaturally beautiful girl with a hideous monster. † (Iona,Peter, 1980,p. 180) The fairytale puts emphasis on how beautiful Belle is and how ugly the beast is. Similarly Sleeping Beauty â€Å"had a beautiful face and she thought beautiful thoughts†, Snow White â€Å"grew into a beautiful woman†, when Cinderella arrived at the ball everyone wondered â€Å"Who is that beautiful girl? † and The Little Mermaid was â€Å"the youngest, and most beautiful, daughter of Mer King. † The initial portrayal of these women is innocent and positive. Any young girl would aspire to possess such favourable qualities and attractiveness. Being beautiful and falling in love with prince charming, then living happily-ever-after, seems to be the most important outcome of these fairy tales. But the question we have to ask ourselves is -are these ‘harmless’ tales instilling false ideas of what life is like for children? One may not think that reading such biased material to a child could possibly have a lasting effect on their perceptions of how one should conform in society, however according to Bettelheim â€Å"A child trusts what the fairy tale tells, because its world view accords with his own† (Bettelheim, 1991, p. 45) The fairytale is so convincing to the child, as the tale matches the child’s thinking, approach and understanding of the world. Bettelheim states â€Å"these fairytales direct the child’s own thinking about his own development, permitting the child to draw his own conclusion†, yet since some classic fairy tales are known to display gender stereotyping, we must ask ourselves, what implication this has on children’s perspectives of specific gender roles in society if the child is drawing his/her own conclusion after reading the fairy tale. Fairy tales portray a black and white view of society. Males are frequently portrayed as the head of the family, who are physically and emotionally strong, and whose sphere exists outside of the home. Females are frequently portrayed as dependent, physically and emotionally weak, and belong inside the home. This depiction of the male and female roles sends a very false and blinding message to its audience. On the other hand it can be argued that stereotypes are a part of life/society. The act of stereotyping serves as a short-cut to the way that the majority of the population views our culture. Therefore, though we might not completely agree with the way in which gender roles are represented in these fairy tales, it still gives a basic understanding of what it means to be a male and what it means to be a female. A similar theme seems to run through all the fairy tales I have chosen. All of the female protagonists are punished in some way as a result of their physical fortune. In Snow White, the evil queen wants the â€Å"fairest of them all† so a search is sent for Snow White to be killed. Snow White ends up cleaning, tidying and cooking for seven dwarfs in the forest as payment for letting her stay. Similarly in Cinderella, the beautiful Cinderella is made servant to her step mother and step sisters. Cinderella is isolated in the house and ignored by her step sisters and step mother. Sleeping Beauty is cursed from the moment she was born as a result of her beauty. A wicked witch was furious that she wasn’t invited to the baby’s banquet so she put a spell on her to remain asleep for a hundred years. Belle in Beauty and the Beast finds herself in a similar situation; she is one of three sisters and the only one who cleans and cooks as a result of her misfortune. The women all have a variety of traits in common. All of the female characters I have mentioned display admirable qualities. All of the women are kind and gentle but these female characters are viewed as being passive and submissive. These women depend on the male characters in the tales to be either saved or to be happy. This sends out an extremely negative stereotype to young readers, presenting that women’s job in life is cook, clean and wait for â€Å"Prince Charming† to come in order to be happy. According to Bettelheim it is child’s life experiences that teach the child the right manner, he goes on to say â€Å"when children are young, it is literature that carries such information best. † (Tartar, 1999, p. 69) If this is the case then children reading heavily stereotyped tales from an early age will impact their manner and possibly the way they view the gender roles. Bettelheim also states that a child’s â€Å"mind is animistic† and children especially young girls are vulnerable to believing that being beautiful and meeting prince charming are key goals and will result in a â€Å"happily ever after. † West (2004) argues that â€Å"books are such a major influence in the formation of children’s values and attitudes that adults need to monitor nearly every word that children read. (Hunt, 1999, p. 5) If this is the case, should we be reading child fairy tales? It was the feminist movement that brought a closer examination of gender roles in fairytales. In Lissa Paul’s article she argues that â€Å"While children’s literature is predicated on the notion that children are essentially blank or naive and are in need of protection and instruction, then issues of suitability or unsuitability are important. † (Hunt, 1999, p121) This idea seems to be evident in feminist’s attitudes with regards the lead female character in fairy tales. Feminists feel that these women over rely on their beauty and each wait, in some way or another, for their Prince Charming to come rescue them. According to Lissa Paul’s article, while discussing Cinderella, she states that â€Å"Most of us- women, children and feminist critics, I imagine – don’t want to be seen valuing riches. Or princes for that matter† (Hunt, 1999, p. 112). However many of the fairy tales chosen for the essay have the common theme of a male hero rescuing or saving the female heroine in the story. They solely depend on the prince to come save them in the end. In Cinderella her family feels she is inferior to them and so she serves as a slave in her own home. â€Å"They were very unkind to her and ordered her about from morning until night. † She is too weak to stand up to them and so waits for a prince to come rescue her. Similarly in Sleeping Beauty she sleeps for one hundred years before a prince comes and rescues her, in Beauty and the Beast, Belle finally ends up with a handsome prince â€Å"the beast disappeared and in his place stood a handsome prince†. In Snow White after she ate the poison apple, she lay peacefully in her coffin until a prince fell in love with her and rescued her â€Å"she opened her eyes and on seeing the handsome prince she fell in love with him†. There is evidently a strong portrayal of physical beauty in these fairy tales and these images of the female protagonist gives a very weak and negative display of women’s abilities and aspirations. On the contrary, however, a very interesting aspect is in Beauty and the Beast. Belle demonstrates having a mind of her own compared to her female counterparts whose main focus was to find their handsome prince using their good looks. Belle looks beyond physical appearance and recognises the good man in the Beast â€Å"she has not mistaken a human lover for a monster, like Psyche, or failed to see a good man beneath the surface.. †(Warner, 1995,p. 307) This follows her gradual arousal of both attraction and sexuality for the Beast throughout the course of the fairytale until he unsurprisingly too turns into a handsome prince at the end. â€Å"Beauty’s wooer has the appearance of a monster, and only after Belle has overcome her aversion for his vile shape can the monster be seen to be a handsome prince. (Opie, 1980, p. 180) The notion of being socially stable is put forward to us. Once these women are saved by their ‘Prince Charming’ and fall in love with him, they are rewarded with a luxurious life as a princess and will ultimately ‘live happily ever after’. The Little Mermaid was written by Hans Christen Andersen in 1836 and was released by Walt Disney in 1989. This fairyt ale was hoped to go against the grain and portray a leading women who wasn’t submissive or passive but strong and independent and good role model of young children. The tale is about a young teenage mermaid, called Ariel, who doesn’t like her life under the sea and is much more fascinated by the human world. Regardless of her father’s warnings she exchanges her voice for legs with the evil witch to spend three days on land. She must make Prince Eric fall in love with her and kiss her or else she becomes the sea witch’s forever. The witch reassures her â€Å"the graceful form, the modest gait and speaking eyes. With such as these, it will easy to infatuate a vain human male† (Anderson, 1993,p. 8). It is clear from that short summary that the tale still managed to stereotype women. The message being sent out is that if Ariel relies on her beauty alone she will get the Prince to fall in love with her. Trites 1990 said, â€Å"Undoubtedly, feminists’ have criticized Ariel because she seems to have little ambition beyond getting her prince. † (http://charlottesmedia. blogspot. com/) The story of Mulan helped c hange the perception of women in Fairy tales but still managed to imply a message that women are inferior to men. Mulan is no one’s trophy and to me is the first groundbreaking Disney film to show a woman to be capable of taking the same roles of men. The story is based on a Chinese myth about a woman who saves china from the Huns. She goes to fight in the war instead of her father and displays traits that are stereotyped as only being male. She is a strong and a courageous woman and breaks social boundaries and expectations. However, Mulan is similar to Belle in Beauty and the Beast, as she too isn’t seen as acceptable in society and this idea of gender obligations is evident. Women ‘should’ be a homemaker and a wife, not cleaver and strong. Finally the film Shrek, created in the 22th century and displays beauty in a different way. Beauty is displayed on the inside in this new image of the princess, which I found to be really refreshing. The two leading characters are ogres. The film goes against the classical fairy tale characteristics. Princess Fiona is different from other princesses and does not wait for prince charming to rescue her. She is a dependent woman who is able to stand on her own two feet. She chooses Shrek as a husband and decides to live her own life as an ogre. This is a unique fairytale as Fiona overlooks physical beauty and is not saved by a male, which results in her having a better life. However she still does live her life as a princess. Unfortunately, many women today hold a â€Å"princess attitude†, and aspire to have a princess type of life. This attitude can be seen among some girls and young women. They often believe that marrying well, especially financially, is desirable, so they can easily live the life of a princess. This may very well be an effect caused by the women that are presented to us in these fairy tales since early childhood. Certainly a clear progression can be seen with regards the representation of women between the 17th-18th century fairy tales (Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty) and the 19th -22nd century fairy tales (Mulan, Shrek). I do appreciate that the morals and values are changing in regard to fairytales in recent years. As a whole, however, In my opinion I think that the fairy tales discussed portray a negative stereotype to young children and are not good role models. According to Zipes â€Å"We can continue to enjoy this harmless pastime of telling classical fairytales to our children, not realising the possible harm or harmlessness. Zipes, 2006,p. 57) Bibliography Andersen, H. C. Fairy Tales: The Little Mermaid, Bristol, Parragon Book Service Ltd, 1993. Bettelheim, B. The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning And Importance Of Fairy Tales, England, Penguin, 1991. Charlotte’s media blog. available at http://charlottesmedia. blogspot. com/ accessed on 14/4/2012 Hunt, peter. Children’s Li terature, An illustrated History, Oxford, University Press,1995. Hunt, Peter. Understanding Children’s Literature, London, Routledge, 1999. Ladybird, Snow White And The 7 Dwarfs, Ladybird Ltd, 2005. Marsoli, L. A. Mulan, NY, Mouse Works, 1998. Opie, Iona ; Peter, The Classic Fairy Tales, USA, Oxford University Press, 1980. Soanes, Catherine, and  Angus Stevenson. Concise Oxford English dictionary. New York:  Oxford University Press,2012. Southgate, V. Beauty and the Beast, UK, Ladybird Books Ltd, 1988. Southgate, V. Cinderella, UK, Ladybird Books Ltd, 1982. Southgate, V. Sleeping Beauty, UK, Ladybird Books Ltd, 1984. Warner, M. Beast to the Blonde ,London, Vintage. 1995. Zipes, Jack. Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion, New York, Routledge, 2006. Film: Shrek, Disney, 2001. How to cite Fairtale Essay, Essay examples

Saturday, May 2, 2020

Elektra Products free essay sample

How might top management have done a better job changing Electra-Quik into a new kind of organization? What might they do now to get the empowerment process back on track? Elektra Products, Inc. is facing problems such turn down of market share, weak internal communication among departments, low morale, and employees were seeking other jobs. Therefore, the organization has to create a solution which can solve or reduce the problems. Decline of the market share was one of the external problems faced by them which implies that their profit and revenue has been falling as well. To improve upon this they could do research and development about what the customers are demanding and if they would be willing to buy their products. In addition, they should buy new machinery in order to encourage new product innovation. This way they will be able to compete with the foreign and domestic competitors. There are many internal problems as well. We will write a custom essay sample on Elektra Products or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page One of the major problems of the company is that the morale of the employees is low and the labour turnover is high. This is due to the lack of vision and mission statements. These statements help employees unify each other to achieve a common goal. Another internal problem was the leadership style used. The management should not only focus on the training of top managers. Due to the extremely precarious case of the organisation, the management need to take an interest with the middle managers as well as the first-line managers (Boone and Kurtz, 2011). They would need to conduct training sessions for all these levels to revive the past glory of the company and increase the morale of everyone in the company, whatever position the employees may be in. To get the empowerment back on track, the top managers have to motivate the employees with empowering interpretations to bring new future and hope for the organization. They have to minimize the problems of the organisation with these following techniques. Firstly, the top management should call a meeting with the organisation employees, arrange various training, discussion that would enable change of the employees attitude positively, improve their communication and motivation, and create sense of partnership of the organization. As stated by the multimillionaire Gary Vaynerchuks 2012) â€Å"The only way to succeed is to be completely transparent . By doing so, then only the employees are able to understand the ideas of the top management. In addition, since the employees of the company might be still unaware of Martin because he is new, he can talk to them personally to improve internal relations which will gain their trust and increase confidence. Secondly, conducting a market su rvey will help with innovation. The survey helps the organization to know about its competitors, for example, having knowledge about the competitor’s price strategy, product design, brand name and customer’s feedback. Lastly, the organization has to develop committee with the goal departments. The committee has to give a lot of attention for the departments like sales and marketing, production, manufacturing, and human resource management (HRM) as there is a more visible gap among these departments. Therefore, to accomplish the empowerment processes, the top management and Martin Griffin should try their best to change the attitudes of employees like Simon and many others that have a negative outlook of the empowerment by bestowing training. Question 2. Can you think of ways Barbara could have avoided the problems her team faced in the meeting with department heads? There are different ways that Barbara could have done to avoid the problems her team faced in the meeting with department heads. Barbara could have used different tactics to keep away from the issues which occurred in the meeting. Firstly, internal communication between different departments of the company should be clearer; managers from every department should discuss among each other in order to avoid arguments and be more time-efficient. Secondly, Barbara and her team should have been more considerate and critically analysed the issues of the other departments’ as well while giving the presentation. For example, since financial department is worried about the â€Å"unethical customers and salesperson’’, they could’ve mentioned about improving product quality since they are in the manufacturing team and offering after sales services to avoid customers to return products back (Roger,2010). Other than that, Barbara and her team should implement the sense of trust within each other. Trust is the key ingredient in having an organization to expand in quality. For example, Simon needed to place trust into the decision of empowerment that has been given from Martin Griffin. By trusting, his idea and performing it with passion then only the company can see the effect of the idea of empowerment. Whether the effect is positive or not, we can narrow down the problem since the staff is already working with passion. According to Steve covey’s (2006), there are 13 behaviours that establish trust. The most important behaviour out of 13 is ‘straight talk’. This point elaborate on how a person should say what they mean when they are having difficulty to adapt to a situation. Question 3 If you were Barbara Russell, what would you do now? Why? If I’m Barbara Russell, I will choose to push slowly for reform and work for gradual support from the other teams. Communication is the key to link each other in the organization. Barbara should have open discussion with the department leaders to figure out the difficulty and solutions to her team’s plan. Amy Barrett (2008) said that, â€Å"Your workforces skills change over time and so does your business. Getting the right people into the right jobs is key to your companys growth. Nevertheless, effective communication between employer-employee and even employee-employee led to minimize misunderstanding, respectful, and create friendly environment in the office. In fact, the company can host social committee to organize events to unite their employees or games in a team. In that way, employees have chances to know each other and sharing information. Company goals should be clearly communicated and displayed in some way throughout the workplace. Barbara could propose SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Responsible person and the Time specific) as guideline for goal setting of both management level and employees. Meanwhile, everyone would have their own goals and these should align with company goals at same, and the organization growth will be on the same horizontal. The management level played the major role to keep their staffs in the correct direction, measure, and support each other to achieve goals. In addition, she could modify the mission and vision statements of the company to give a clear goal to the employees. Along of above point, SWOT (Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis which Ricky and Ronald (2006) both state that â€Å"involves assessing organizational strengths and weaknesses and environmental opportunities and threats† can be applied to assist on employee’s self-assessment. Employees could evaluate their abilities to task assignment and hence, they can be promoted to assign additional task. In between, they could take in some self-improvement programs such as education or training to enhance their skills and knowledge. For example, the salesperson will take in more responsibility on the product refund and protection of information privacy. They must always be prepared to make decision clearly and protect the interest of company.

Sunday, March 22, 2020

Diagnostic Testing Essays - Iowa Tests Of Educational Development

Diagnostic Testing The purpose of this report is to give Mr. and Mrs. G., Nicholas G.'s parents, a more complete and up to date picture of Nick's academic skill levels. Nick is a neighbor of the examiner, and both parents and examinee have cherrfully volunteered Nick as testing subjuect for the examiner's Diagnostic Testing class. Nicholas has been in the Special Day Class Program, attending Santa Barbara public schools since kindergarten. Nicholas is developementally delayed and has mild cerebral palsy. Nick's parents report that he has made good academic and social skills progress, especially in the past two years. Strong parental concern remains in the area of reading and independent life skills. Nick feels that he writes and cuts with extreme difficulty, hates reading, and enjoys math and computers. Nick attends several mainstream classes per semester with an aide's help, and appears to have enjoyed the social aspects, but feels the classes were "really hard." Nick's mother reports that his hearing and vision have been checked within the past six months, with no apparent problems. Despite academic and motor frustrations, Nick's school attendence has been excellent, as has been his general health. Results of academic achievement testing: Woodcock-Johnson Revised: Age Grade Standard Percentile Equiv. Equiv. Score Letter-word Identification 7-2 1.7 49 0.1 Word-Attack 7-1 1.6 62 1.0 Basic Reading Skills 7-2 1.6 52 0.1 Passage Comprehension 7-3 1.7 51 0.1 Reading Vocabulary 6-6 1.2 41 0.1 Broad Reading 7-3 1.7 44 0.1 Dictation 6-5 1.1 29 0.1 Spelling 6-9 1.4 45 0.1 Writing Samples 6-9 1.3 29 0.1 Broad Written Language 6-8 1.3 31 0.1 Calculation 6-9 1.3 28 0.1 Quantitative Concepts 7-6 2.1 53 0.1 Applied Problems 7-0 1.6 59 0.3 Broad Mathematics 6-10 1.4 40 0.1 Visual-Motor Integration ( VMI) (normed on 12-2) raw score 8 standard score 5 %ile 1.0 Visual-Aural Digit Span (VADS) Aural-Oral 3 Visual-Oral 3 Aural Written 2 Visual- Written 2 Total VADS 10 (defective range, grade 4) Nicholas appeared relaxed and eager to please while testing. Once in awhile he would say, "this is hard," but when given the option of stopping or going on he would consistently express a desire to continue. His parents report that this stubborn tenacity has carried him beyond expectations. Nick has a good sense of family, community, and social settings. When offered a cookie on a napkin, he put the napkin on his lap. Nick enjoyed talking between tests about friends, cars, computers, and other age-appropriate subjects. During the testing he concentrated very hard, took his time, and did not answer until he seemed quite sure of his answers. While in deep concentration, Nick's head would temporarily stop the constant movement apparant with cerebral palsy. His mother stated that this recent ability to temporarily cease head movement has aided his reading progress. READING: Test results show that Nick appears to be reading at a level comparable to that of an average student at the grade 1.7 level, which rank at the Very Low level. Reading tasks at the 1.4 level will be easy for Nick, those above grade 2.0 will be difficult for him. It is noted that on the word attack and Word Analysis Skills test, when decoding nonsense words Nick could decode CVC pattern words and has learned some basic sound-symbol associations. Comprehension tests show that Nicholas candetermine meaning from a passage (Passage Comprehension 1.7) at a slightly higher level than he can from a single word (Reading Vocabulary 1.2). While these scores are also in the Very Low range, they show that Nick is beginning to use some contextual clues in his reading. WRITTEN LANGUAGE: Nick's test results on Broad Written Language is comparable to that of the average student in grade 1.3, and in the Very Low range of scores. Tasks requiring written language skills below grade level 1.1 will be easy for him; those above the grade 1.4 will be difficult for him. Spelling Test observations (1.4) showed that Nick has difficulty with short vowel useage, the fine e rule, and consonant blends. An informal writing sample showed that Nick could use correct punctuation at the end of a sentence, but ignored punctuation marks within a sentence. The same sample showed that Nick's writing is legible and that he forms most of his letters correctly, having difficulty with line placement . Nick interspersed cursive letters, and verbally expressed a desire to write in cursive like "mainstream buddies" do. Nick uses simple sentence structures, writing one compound sentence out of 10 total sentences. Because of his orthopedic impairments, the written language tests were untimed. MATHEMATICS: Nick's

Thursday, March 5, 2020

Free Essays on History Of KKK

The Ku Klux Klan The KU KLUX KLAN is a group of white secret societies who oppose the advancement of blacks, Jews, Gays and other Minority groups. The Ku KLux Klan also known as the KKK or the Klan, Is active in The United States of America and Canada. It often uses violence to achieve its goal in society. The KKK members wear robes and hoods, and burn crosses at their outdoor meetings. They will also burn crosses to scare non-members. The KKK was formed as a social club by a group of confederate army veterans in Pulaski, Tenn., in 1866, but still goes on today. A former confederate general , was the first Klan Leader , called the Grand Wizard. The group took its name from the Greek word kyklos, meaning circle, and the English word clan. Klan members, who believed in the superiority of whites, soon began to terrorize blacks to keep them from voting or exercising the other rights they had gained during Reconstruction, the period following the end of the American Civil War in 1865. The Klan threatened, beat, and murdered many blacks in the South. To hide their identity, Klan terrorists wore robes and hoods, draped sheets over their horses, and rode at night. The KKK spread rapidly throughout the Southern United States and became known # as the Invisible Empire. Its attacks helped drive blacks out of Southern political life. In 1871, Congress passed the Force Bill, which gave the President the authority to use federal troops against the Klan. The KKK soon disappeared. They then returned to Society in the early 1900’s. In 1915, William J. Simmons, a former Methodist clergyman, organized a new Klan in Atlanta, Ga., as a patriotic, society. The Klan directed its activities against groups it considered un-American, including blacks, immigrants, Jews, and particularly Roman Catholics. The KKK grew rapidly and by the mid-1920's had more than 2 million members throughout the country. The Invisible Empire ... Free Essays on History Of KKK Free Essays on History Of KKK The Ku Klux Klan The KU KLUX KLAN is a group of white secret societies who oppose the advancement of blacks, Jews, Gays and other Minority groups. The Ku KLux Klan also known as the KKK or the Klan, Is active in The United States of America and Canada. It often uses violence to achieve its goal in society. The KKK members wear robes and hoods, and burn crosses at their outdoor meetings. They will also burn crosses to scare non-members. The KKK was formed as a social club by a group of confederate army veterans in Pulaski, Tenn., in 1866, but still goes on today. A former confederate general , was the first Klan Leader , called the Grand Wizard. The group took its name from the Greek word kyklos, meaning circle, and the English word clan. Klan members, who believed in the superiority of whites, soon began to terrorize blacks to keep them from voting or exercising the other rights they had gained during Reconstruction, the period following the end of the American Civil War in 1865. The Klan threatened, beat, and murdered many blacks in the South. To hide their identity, Klan terrorists wore robes and hoods, draped sheets over their horses, and rode at night. The KKK spread rapidly throughout the Southern United States and became known # as the Invisible Empire. Its attacks helped drive blacks out of Southern political life. In 1871, Congress passed the Force Bill, which gave the President the authority to use federal troops against the Klan. The KKK soon disappeared. They then returned to Society in the early 1900’s. In 1915, William J. Simmons, a former Methodist clergyman, organized a new Klan in Atlanta, Ga., as a patriotic, society. The Klan directed its activities against groups it considered un-American, including blacks, immigrants, Jews, and particularly Roman Catholics. The KKK grew rapidly and by the mid-1920's had more than 2 million members throughout the country. The Invisible Empire ...

Tuesday, February 18, 2020

The Transfer of Japanese-Style Management to American Subsidiaries Research Paper

The Transfer of Japanese-Style Management to American Subsidiaries - Research Paper Example Firstly, the organization should desist from over-depending on personal relationships. Within Japanese sales situations, personal relations with customers are the single most crucial aspect of sales. This is hardly ever the case in the US. Although personal relations are essential in the US, they are not as vital as in Japan (Beechler and Yang 482). Americans are more independent than the Japanese and do not conform to a culturally established need to seek out personal relationships. Often, Americans find it vital to deter the appearance of favoritism opting to conduct business strictly on an emotionally distant basis. It is, therefore, critical that the Japanese realize that they should conduct business primarily on the basis of price, product fit or quality regardless of personal relationships. A notable benefit to the Japanese company is that, as a consequence of the natural interpersonal distance in the US business relations; the conventional Japanese requirement of sending expen sive seasonal gifts to potential, current, and past customers is not necessary. In truth, many Americans consider Japanese gift-giving practices as expensive, excessive and reason for ethical concern. In addition, the Japanese company will also need to change its culture of disparaging the company. In order to show humility and proper hierarchical status, Japanese businesspeople often criticize, disparage and demean themselves, their own products and company. Although this form of outward humility is a norm in Japan, it can result in diminished sales in the US. A Japanese customer automatically understands that a Japanese businessperson demeaning his company or product does so out of cultural behavior even in the event that the product is the best in the industry (Beechler and Yang 486). This is not so in the US, hence in order to attain success in the US production industry, Digital Frontier should express confidence by touting the strength of its  products and services.